PIG teams up with Kim Gehrig and Somesuch for Coke

In the latest series of Covid-19 related films, Coca-Cola has recently released “The Great Meal”. For this 90s feature, PIG China’s team here in Shanghai teamed up with Somesuch, director Kim Gehrig and Coca-Cola to bring you a piece chocked full of classic, family-friendly goodness.

The Shanghai portions of the film were shot entirely on location, in and around Shanghai, by PIG with director Kim Gehrig, via remote film-making (more info on PIG Remote here).

Watch the full film at the end

Coca-Cola’s first new film since the Covid-19 breakout centers around family and food.

In their new global campaign,“Together Tastes Better”, this launch film, titled “The Great Meal” conveys the brand’s optimistic take on this shared experience, celebrating some of the silver linings of the time we have spent together over meals and around the table. Around the world, people have come to re-appreciate the things that matter most and take that gratitude and humility with us moving forward.

The film was shot remotely in the midst of global Covid-19 lockdowns. It showcases 13 real families, couples, housemates in households from Orlando, Shanghai, Lisbon, Kiev, London, Mumbai, and Mexico City. The families in the film cook the foods of their cultures and share an often-overlooked, moment of togetherness.

This anthemic film that will run from June 29th in the US and in a myriad of countries including Germany, Spain, Morocco, France, most Asian countries, and India, among others, in the next weeks and months.

The film was directed by Kim Gehrig, produced by Somesuch with support of PIG in China.

Coca-Cola ‘The Great Meal’

‘The Great Meal’ directed by Kim Gehirg for Coca-Cola

What happens pool-side… Recap of 2020 Shanghai Sessions

​Move along LV, your 15 minutest of glory is indubitably and irrevocably over——but still, be sure to call if you need to shoot something.

Shanghai has taken the over-sized, anatomically, uh, questionable blow-up dragons and she’s boarded them up in a broom closet down the long hallway of repressed [sic] memories.

From the looks of Saturday night’s social media feeds of Shanghai’s who’s whos, we have definitive proof that on 8/8, this belle of a town belonged to the PIGman.

Below a recap of our most glorious and triumphant moments from PIG’s pool-side BBQ, Shanghai Sessions 2020: No Cannes, No problem!

Event Gallery

We’ve got more events in the pipes for fall, stay tuned. In the meantime, stay safe and carry on!

PIGMAN: Ren Hang

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Chinese artist Ren Hang committed suicide on Feb 24th, at the age of 29

Women’s Day: SK-II #changedestiny campaign’s newest film

Skincare darling SK-II continues to support China’s single women through its #changedestiny campaign with a new film exploring traditional family expectations on marriage.

Watch full film here.

SK-II’s newest film “Meet Me Halfway” by PIG director Floyd Russ

The short documentary “Meet Me Halfway” follows three bright and single Chinese ladies as they finally reach out and open up to their parents after years of avoidance due to marriage pressure fears. 

SK-II hopes to encourage open dialogue about marriage expectations and be a source of empowerment for women everywhere to feel more confident about their life choices.

The brainchild of agency Forsman & Bodenfors, directed by Floyd Russ and produced by Tool of North America, “Meet Me Halfway” was entirely shot on location in different parts of China by P.I.G CHINA.

SK-II’s first film “Leftover Women” by PIG director Floyd Russ

The Chinese Animation Gold Rush

With a huge potential box office rewards and no established domestic studio brands dominating the playing field, the enormous opportunity for creators of animated movies has seen a collective mobilization across the media ecosystem towards the genre.

For some, the catalyst was the enormous success of 2015’s “Monkey King: Hero Returns”, which earned 956 million yuan ($139m) at the box office and shattered the previous record for a full CG animation.

40150de413911abMonkey King: Hero Returns, produced by October Annimation Studio

Others, like DreamWorks, saw the market potential years ago.  In 2012 the company struck a $350m (2.4bn yuan) joint venture deal with three Chinese investment companies to form a studio on the ground in China, Oriental DreamWorks, which could circumvent the foreign film quota.

The government has played its part, offering grants and incentives for companies to make animation, eager to promote China’s creative evolution and production of soft power products that it can ultimately wield on the world stage.  That initiative has included facilitating international coproduction treaties, enabling substantial moviemaking partnerships, like those between China and companies in New Zealand and the UK.

Oriental DreamWorksOriental DreamWorks

Meanwhile, as China transitions from outsourcing destination to original creator, former service companies are turning to original content creation, like China’s leading visual effects provider, Base FX, and veteran CG studio Original Force, both of whom have major animated features in the works.

Established live action studios are getting in on the act too.  In October 2015, Beijing Enlight Media formed ‘Color Room’, an animation and live action division, to invest, incubate IP, and manage productions, while Huayi Brothers has also established an animation arm, Wink, to develop four animation features every year.

1Kung Fu Panda 3, co-produced by Oriental DreamWorks and DreamWorks

Companies with interests across multiple industries are adding animation to their portfolios.  Internet behemoth Tencent created film production arm, Tencent Pictures, which is developing and producing a diverse slate of 21 film and TV projects, while in 2015, Alpha, a giant Guangdong toy and clothing conglomerate, announced a 900 million yuan ($141 million) acquisition of original internet comic platform U17.com, with a view to converting the IP into movies.

Tough Terrain

The ground in China may be fertile, but the climate is uncertain. Fewer tickets are being subsidised than they were in 2015, sales are growing more slowly than expected and the Chinese box office won’t, as many had predicted, become the world’s largest in 2017.  Moreover, competition is fierce. The growing number of new Chinese films will compete with each other and a relentless onslaught of offerings from the established global big guns that make it in to China as part of the import quota.

1-20Japanese Animation: Your Name

There is no established Chinese animated entertainment brand, no household name animation directors or studios and very few known properties. In most cases, Chinese studios must develop IP from scratch, guessing what will work, or buy the rights to book, game or toy properties with an existing following and try to convert them in to compelling motion pictures. However, good animation writers are hard to come by, with the best talent historically drawn to the relatively better prospects in live action.

Moreover, the tastes of the rapidly morphing audience are as unpredictable as ever. The lazy assumption about unsophisticated masses that eat up Chinese mythology and spectacular visual effects is outdated. Audiences and reviewers are fiercely critical of sub par stories, recently prompting Party mouthpiece People’s Daily to publish an editorial piece slamming ‘vicious and irresponsible’ critics.

p2217523557One Hundred Thousand Bad Jokes, produced by YouYaoQi

The hope is that creators will be emboldened by the successes of ‘alternative’ films like the auteur driven “Big Fish & Begonia”, adult fare like “100,000 Bad Jokes” and Japanese indie efforts like “Your Name”, all of which demonstrate that there is a significant market for edgier content.

The unpredictability may partly explain why Chinese animation studios aren’t placing all their bets on the domestic audience. Whether for their first film release or a later offering, almost all studios say the eventual target is the global market.

Big Fish & Begonia, produced by Biantian Media

Joe Aguilar, CEO at Wink, says that for an animation studio in China to succeed, there are two key considerations.  The first is China’s ‘content wealth.’  “Chinese culture is more popular in the global market, and can produce infinite original stories with Chinese elements,” he says.  That may be true, but no Chinese film, animated or otherwise, has yet cracked the major US or European markets. One explanation may be a fundamental difference in storytelling sensibility between the East and the West.  Many senior studio executives have pointed to a looser Chinese story structure that is inaccessible to the West.

Western tastes might evolve with greater exposure to Chinese content, but that process will take years. In the meantime, Aguilar’s second point – that movies need to “emphasize international ways of expression, which make the movies globally more acceptable”- is the reason almost all studios with serious designs on the global market have established development studios in L.A. and/or installed Hollywood experience in executive positions.

The First Batch

This year will see the first serious runners among the multiple newcomers to the Chinese animated features race.

“Duck Duck Goose”, the first release from Original Force, is the pick of the bunch.  Led by a triumvirate boasting decades of experience in both Hollywood and China, the studio has seemingly all the right elements to create something of real quality for its debut feature.

MV5BOTU4ODYxMjItNWNhZS00ZDIzLWFjMWUtMzQ3MjU1ODY1MDEzXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyMjExMzEyNTM@._V1_Duck Duck Goose, produced by Original Force

Then there is Light Chaser Animation, the Beijing studio founded by Tudou founder and billionaire, Gary Wang.  Wang raised eyebrows by assuming writing and directing duties for the studio’s debut feature in 2015, despite having never previously written or directed an animated film.  He reprises the role for this year’s follow up, “Tea Pets”.

Tea Pets, produced by Light Chaser Animation

Guangzhou’s Yi Animation will release its first original movie, “Kung Food”, the feature film adaptation of the studio’s TV series, “Super Bao”, a stereoscopic 3D movie about living pieces of food uniting to prevent bland flavours from conquering the world. Coproduced by 21st Century Fox, the “Kung Food” is the only IP among this year’s contenders to have any existing fan base in China.

Kung Food, produced by Yi Animation

Finally, “Watch The Skies” is the first feature from DeZerlin Media, a creative content boutique that generates IP for animated and live-action features and series, games and print. It adopts a Western-style studio model, creating the IP and managing the property, but outsourcing the animation locally.

It is safe to assume the new crop of Chinese animation films will bring better character performance and production values.  Local audience will no longer accept substandard quality. The most compelling questions circulate around story. The risks might suggest studios will err on the side of caution for their debuts.  Will we thus see Hollywood films with Chinese elements – like the Kung Fu Panda franchise – or can a distinctly Chinese tone begin to shine through?  Will a director be afforded the time and trust to realize a vision, as Tian did for “Monkey King” or Liang Xuan and Zhang Chun did for “Big Fish & Begonias”?  This year, we’ll start to have some of those questions answered.

Moving hearts with Operation Smile

P.I.G. CHINA, French production company QUAD and Cheil Beijing created a heart-warming film for Operation Smile, an NGO providing surgical aid to children with cleft lip.  Viewers journey through a polluted Shanghai with a masked albeit joyful little girl.  The final scene reveals she was happy to dawn a pollution mask because this is the one time during which no one can see her cleft lip.  The little heroine’s wide, endearing eyes help to soften the stigmatization children with cleft lip in China endure but the reality of this prescient health issue still remains at the close of the film.

Watch the full film here.

Directed by Henry Mason with support from cinematographer Rain Li, the film was entirely shot in and around Shanghai over two days. Grading and visual effects were created by FIN Design and Effects.  Green United Music (GUM) composed the gentle piano tune in the background.  Beautifully shot, this touching film is helping Operation Smile raise awareness around the stigma of children suffering with cleft lip. 

Where Does China’s Virtual Reality Industry Stand in 2017?

The Chinese VR industry is increasingly making headlines, both for Bloomberg’s much quoted estimate that it will be worth $8.5bn by 2020, and because it has been the first to monetize VR in any meaningful way.  Surveys show that Chinese consumers are willing to pay more than $15 per month for good content. The problem, and the opportunity, is that currently, there is very little of it.

Kevin Geiger is here to help.  The former Disney CG artist first landed in Beijing in 2008 to produce projects and teach, going on to serve as Disney China’s Vice President and Head of Creative.  A little over a year ago he founded the International Animation & Virtual Reality Research Center (iAVRrc), a virtual and augmented reality content development studio operated by China’s leading film school, the Beijing Film Academy (BFA).  Between the center, his content production company (Magic Dumpling), a regular LinkedIn presence, AWN.com blog and his own online journal, the Ohioan has become one of the more prominent western voices in Chinese animation and virtual reality.

We joined Geiger to get his take on the domestic industry at the end of 2016.

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PIG: In traditional media, China is generally seen to be a step back from the rest of the world.  That appears to have changed with VR.  Would you agree? 

Kevin Geiger:  In many areas of VR, China is ahead of the game.  In terms of the energy level, China ranks number one.  In terms of just the pervasive amount of hardware and software development, number one.  On quality of the locally developed hardware and software, I would not say number one. Catching up, but still back a step from the rest of the world.  There are far more experience zones in China than there are in the U.S. Even though they may be lower grade, they’re very pervasive.  There’s not nearly as much content being developed here as elsewhere for VR, and not nearly of the quality.  It feels like every VR content startup in the West is drawing on Pixar, Sony, Disney or Dreamworks for people to jump into the fray.  China doesn’t really have that bench depth, and with the investment weariness in content, people are waiting to see who else is doing what before they jump in. And, frankly, there are a lot of restrictions.  If you’re developing VR games, you fall into regulatory restrictions where have a one to four month regulatory approval period.  If you’re a startup trying to get a game onto the shelf so you can recoup your investment, that can kill you.  And of course, the content itself is tempered.  Censorship does have a chilling effect on the entire ecosystem of creative development and production, and that’s not necessarily in the service of the business, the industry, or even, ultimately, the culture.

image2iAVRrc Project: Story Forest

PIG:  Why is investment in content lagging behind hardware?

KG: Investors understand that content is the important thing.  They know it, but they really don’t have the stomach for it.  It’s more secure – but I think a false security – to invest in a widget, a piece of hardware or software, as opposed to an IP.  If you don’t get the returns you want and you’ve invested in something physical, you can sell it off and recoup something.  With IP, it’s not always the case.  I was at an event yesterday where investors were talking about their disenchantment with content, saying, “We’re pulling back from investing in content. We’re going to focus on hardware and hope the content that’s developed uses that hardware.”  I’m biased, because I’m a content guy, but I was a little surprised to hear that stated so bluntly.  It seemed a regressive approach to me, but I respect their points of view.

image3iAVRrc Project: Hutong Hunt

PIG: Do you think that attitude is widespread across China’s virtual reality industry?

KG:  I hope not.  Investors in general run the range from informed to uninformed, and from bold to risk averse.  China has enough people in every area of the ecosystem that even if 200 people say they’re not investing in content anymore, there are thousands more who are. I don’t think it’s necessarily epidemic and certainly Alvin Wang (China Regional President, HTC Vive) said he doesn’t see a chilling effect.  From his point of view, even though investors are asking more questions, he sees a widespread enthusiasm for the entire chain: hardware, software content distribution.

PIG: Which China-created VR experiences have impressed you?

KG:  I was impressed by Noitom’s Project Alice here in Beijing – this mixed reality experience of physically holding a bar stool in my hand, feeling the weight and the shape of it and seeing a digital representation of it in VR.  I was very aware that I was in VR, and the CGI rendering was not photoreal, but it didn’t have to be. It was so compelling that, very quickly, the other things in the room that were not mapped to a physical object became dangerous because I would want to sit on something that didn’t turn out to have a physical corollary.  When I visited their lab, the enthusiasm of the team really had that buzz that you expect at the best places.  It’s a big loft space with a 3D printer for rapid prototyping pieces of hardware on the fly.  There’s this middle aged Chinese seamstress on an old Singer sewing machine stitching together plastic and spandex full body suits. Espresso machines every five meters. Just the energy and the enthusiasm of the people working there is encouraging to me.

paNoitom Project Alice

PIG: With the dearth of truly spectacular experiences or a real business model, the West is arguably in the “trough of disillusionment” when it comes to VR.  Can we expect something similar in China?

KG: Friends of mine in Chinese companies, whether they’re developing content or software, have said it was much easier to get money in Summer 2015 than it is has been this Summer (2016).  The people who are still investing have more questions than they used to, whereas before they were just throwing money at you.   The silver lining is that it will separate the serious from the non-serious and have everybody take a breath and figure out, okay, what is the business model?  Everybody with their heads on fire, as they were a year ago, doesn’t necessarily mean that something’s being accomplished.  If everybody just starts developing hardware, software or content, without any real way to distribute it, with no pipeline, then it’s all just a lot of pomp and circumstance for nothing. 

Investors need to really think about if they’re in it for the long term or not. Especially in China, many investors are very unrealistic in terms of the simple mathematics of how long it takes to get a return.  Take the time of development, production, post and the approval process time – which in China is one month to a half year – then add the distribution, and only then is your first revenue trickling back.  You’re talking about a year or two at least before you can start to see any kind of revenue, let alone profit.  So if you’re not in it for that, don’t waste your time or the time of the people who you’re giving money to.  A VR startup with investors that want a quick turnaround on profit is always required to undercut the more innovative things it’s trying to do and come out with a dumbed-down, scaled-down version, just to try to make a quick buck.

If investors do have a stomach for it, I think there’s a payoff.  I see a future and that’s why I’m involved, but it’s not a quick buck kind of situation.  It’s going to be about putting money in, whether that’s an investor, or a producer like myself deferring fees on a project that I think will advance something.  I think that’s really what’s required to get the seriousness that you need for true progress.

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PIG: What does the International Animation and Virtual Reality Research Center do?

KG: We’re squarely focused on content, across virtual, augmented and mixed reality.  We’re trying to demonstrate that it’s possible to create Chinese content in China by Chinese that follows the prescriptions of what’s permissible, but can also still be engaging.  The Deans of the school gave me a pretty wide berth, but the two guidelines are: one, everything we do has to represent Chinese culture and represent it in a favorable way, and two, that there should be some educational component.  That might sound like a recipe for disaster, where you’re going to end up with this didactic or preachy bit of content, right?  That’s what we’re trying not to do.  We’re trying to have the medicine taste good so that you don’t notice that you’re being taught something.

Happy Chinese New Year!

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PIGMAN: Chinese New Year

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P.I.G China New Director: Jonty Toosey

P.I.G. is very excited to now be representing Jonty Toosey in China.

From a very young age, Jonty has had a fascination for the moving image, experimenting with video and super 8 film in his. Following film school at LIFS in London, he began his directing career in television making promos for BBC, MTV, Discovery Channel and UKTV. Alongside his professional work in advertising he has directed several portrait documentary series for Discovery Channel, National Geographic and France 5.

In his advertising work, Jonty is always striving to create situations that come across as extremely honest and authentic. He extracts scenes within often restrictive and controlled situations that come across completely spontaneous and unrehearsed. His particular style has led him to work with global brands such as Nike, Ford, Mini Cooper, Coca Cola, Lipton Ice tea, Cathay Pacific, Hershey’s Chocolate, Molson Canadian, and Captain Morgan Rum. His campaigns have won him numerous international advertising awards including Cannes Lions for his Nike + and Molson Beer campaigns.

Jonty lives in London.